Coping with Injury and Loss

Coping with Injury and Loss

depressed2When a person sustains a serious injury or sudden loss, he/she will generally experience five reactions: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. These are normal responses that everyone goes through at different rates. It is also important for the affected person to experience all of the stages to help achieve a full recovery. Continue reading “Coping with Injury and Loss”

Stretching: Myths Vs. Realities

Stretching: Myths Vs. Realities

By John O’Halloran, DPT, OCS, LAT, ATC, CSCS, Cert MDT

runnerA very common and acceptable pre exercise or athletic event activity is stretching. Stretching has long been widely recognized as a necessity for fitness, flexibility and above all injury prevention. However over the last couple of years this popular activity has been questioned on whether it really does indeed prevent injury. In 2004 The Centers of Disease Control (CDC) reported that static stretching does not prevent injury. Now as a licensed Physical Therapist and Certified Athletic Trainer I have been telling my patients for years that stretching “prevents” injury. And then the CDC came out with that one and I thought about all the inaccurate advice I had been promoting over the years. Well like anything else you have to not believe everything you read until you critically evaluated the information. After I read the CDC’s review of the literature it was concluded that STATIC STRETCHING did not prevent injury in most populations. It did show that it did prevent injury in older folks and young athletes who require extreme ranges of motion such as ballet or dance. But for the average Joe or Jane who goes out and runs 10-15 miles per week and does a little static calf or quadriceps stretching you cannot state that those stretches will PREVENT injury. Bottom line with all of this is that static (no bouncing) stretching held for 15-20 seconds for 3 repetitions is not going to hurt you but it is not going to prevent injury or improve athletic performance. Continue reading “Stretching: Myths Vs. Realities”

Runner’s Knee/Illiotibial Band Syndrome

Runner’s Knee / Illiotibial Band Syndrome

By Dominic McKinley, MD, CAQ and Joe Mullins, M. Ed., LAT, ATC

iliotibial-bandAccording to an article published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, one in five runners will experience a yearly knee injury (‘Running Injuries to the Knee,’ Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, vol. 3, pp. 309-318, 1995).  Internet searches for the incidence rate of illiotibial band (ITB) syndrome reveals that this malady accounts for an approximate 12% of knee injuries in running.  Therefore, if you are an avid runner, you have a very high chance of experiencing lateral (outside) knee pain at some point in your running life. Continue reading “Runner’s Knee/Illiotibial Band Syndrome”

Learn to Recognize and Treat Common Injuries

Learn to Recognize and Treat Common Injuries

The general population is overwhelmed with common injuries involving the musculoskeletal system, which consists of muscles, bones, joints and ligaments. These injuries can range from minor to severe, and people tend to underestimate minor joint and muscle injuries. Medical advice is often needed to determine the extent of injury and the best treatment program. A delay in the treatment of certain minor injuries can lead to permanent loss of function or can allow the area to be re-injured, causing more serious injuries. Continue reading “Learn to Recognize and Treat Common Injuries”